Cornish Pasties, a timeless treat

What is a Cornish Pasty? The pasty (/’pa:sti/) is a traditional baked pastry and it is so versatile the possibilities are virtually endless. This recipe is my favorite way to fill a pasty, but I have also filled them with pie filling for a special personalized treat.

The Cornish Pasty gets its name from its origin, Cornwall, United Kingdom. But it wouldn’t take much work to find that most cultures all over the world have their own version of “The Pasty”. That is because it’s inexpensive and goes a long way.

So one day I brought some leftover pasties to work for lunch. A coworker was very intrigued by them and told me how a century ago Montana coal miners would bring pasties on the job with them. Coal miners did not make much money, so pasties were the ideal meal. Then more recently I was speaking with a co-worker who spent time living in South Korea and he said they have their own version of the pasty as well. It’s fascinating to see how cultures spread out all over the world have shared the same idea without ever even knowing it.

My Cornish Pasty recipe hits straight at the heart of comfort food. It’s filled with potatoes and freshly chopped vegetables. They can be eaten however you wish, there is no right or wrong way. I love ranch dressing (specifically by the brand “JUST”); I put it on a lot, and I enjoy dipping my pasties in ranch. The last time I made these, my incredible hubby found a recipe for a homemade vegetable gravy and HE made it!!! It was phenomenal! If I had the link I would share it, but you can probably google “vegan gravy recipes” and find yourself a good one.

In my recipe, I also share two different styles you could use to seal your pasties, the spiral (my personal favorite) takes a little practice, and “the fork” (I don’t know the technical term for it, but you use a fork), certainly the easiest method.

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I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as we do in our home. Once you have the dough recipe down, remember, your possibilities are endless. How will you fill your pasties?

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Cornish Pasty

Makes 8 pasties

Prep: 45 minutes  Bake: 35 – 40 minutes

*Allow at least two hours for the dough to sit in the fridge

Pasty Dough Ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 1/2 sticks cold vegan butter (I like to use Earth Balance), separated into small chunks
  • 1/2 cup of ice water

Filling ingredients:

  • 3 small raw potatoes, cut into small 1/4″ chunks
  • 2 medium size carrots, cut into small 1/4″ chunks
  • 1/2 cup fresh or frozen peas
  • (Optional Spices) garlic, cumin, and cayenne
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

*Remember, the dough needs at least two hours to sit in the fridge. I hate it when I start a recipe and learn halfway through that my dough needs to be refrigerated.

  1. In a food processor, add flour, salt, and butter chunks. Pulse until the flour and butter have become course and look like cornmeal. Make sure there isn’t any flour that has not been blended in. If so, use a rubber spatula to stir in the flour and then pulse the processor a few more times.
  2. Place the mixture into a large mixing bowl. Pour 1/2 a cup of water over the mixture. Begin folding the mixture back and forth with your rubber spatula until the dough starts to come together. Then with clean hands knead the dough. If the dough is still too dry add more water, one table-spoon at a time.
  3. Once the dough has come together, divide it in half and form into two disks. Wrap each disk in plastic wrap and place in the fridge for no less than two hours or up to 3 days.
  4. While you’re waiting for the dough to chill, add the chopped potatoes, chopped carrots, and peas to a mixing bowl. Add seasoning and then toss to coat. Set aside.
  5. Preheat the oven to 425ºF. On a floured surface (I use my large cutting board), lay out the first disk. Pat it down so it is flat and level. Next, sprinkle some flour on a sharp chopping knife, then cut the dough down the center vertically, and across the center horizontally, so you have four equally sized pieces. Roll each piece into a ball.
  6. Reflour your work surface and a rolling-pin. Set aside a saucer of water. Place one of the balls of dough in the center of your work space and then begin rolling it, with a rolling-pin, into a large circle, about 1/8″ thick.
  7. Using a one tablespoon measuring spoon, add the filling one tablespoon at a time. I can usually fit 3-4 tablespoons into my pasties.
  8. With your fingers or a basting brush, add water to edges of the dough (about 1/4″). You do not want it too wet, just enough for the edges to come together to create a seal. Now fold the dough over the filling and line up the edges to create a seal. Seal options: Decisions Decisions! Here are two options: Option 1: The fork method and the easiest. Once you’ve lined up the edges press down on them with a fork and done. For a little extra strength, to keep the edges from breaking, I will fold the edges (this makes them thicker) then I will press the edges down with a fork. This method makes the pasties look like cute little pies. Option 2: The spiral. This my personal favorite, because it makes this cheap pastry look like something that came straight from the local bakery. After the edges are lined up, moisten the top edge just a little. Then start at the end and twist inward. Use both of your hands, your right hand (if you’re right-handed, vis-versa if your left.) will start the spiral inward and your left hand will follow through and make it tight. When you’ve reached the other end there will be a little bit of a “tail” (extra dough from stretching) either add water to the “tail” and tuck it into the pasty or simply cut it off. If you’re nervous, you can tear a piece of dough from one of your balls and practice the spiral technique. It is pretty easy once you get the hang of it.
  9. Finally, cut slits into the top to make air vents. This can be a lot of fun. One time I cut our initials into the top.
  10. Place pasties on a greased baking pan and bake in the oven for 35 – 40 minutes or until they’re golden brown. Once they are golden brown, allow them to cool for at least 5 minutes. Pasties can be eaten dry or dipped in a favorite dressing.

Enjoy!

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Heirloom brown bread and a winter wonderland

Thanksgiving is over. Now the hustle and bustle of Christmas preparations begins. I am sad to say that my hubby and I will have to spend our holidays in Montana this season. It’s never an easy decision to make, but when you live 1700 miles away from family these hard choices will often present themselves.

I was blessed with a lovely childhood, I do not take that for granted and I have tried to carry that with me into adulthood and marriage (My journey hasn’t been as effortless as my parents made it look. Though I know there were sacrifices of their own that I did not see.). My family has so many traditions, some classic like watching “It’s a Wonderful Life” the same night we decorate the tree; and some silly ones as well, like always having to stop at the same gas station for coffee and cocoa on our way to grandmas house Christmas day. It’s a cherished lifetime of invaluable memories and instilled in me what really happens when you have traditions. What happens is consistency and quality time, which produces fond memories, which creates hope and excitement for the next time around. I can remember a few of my favorite presents from my childhood, but my fondest memories, the ones I’ve tried to recreate in my own home are the ones that involve my family being together.

A tradition my mom and I have together is baking. She would make several pounds of gingerbread dough and we would decorate dozens of little gingerbread men to share with friends and family. Dad was banned from cookie decorating… I don’t think I need to explain why.

One of our favorite baked goods that’s always on our table during the holiday season is brown bread. It’s basically a loaf of ginger bread. My mom got the recipe from my great grandma Tiffany (One of the most amazing women I have ever met.). I have managed to successfully carry this tradition on into my own household. My husband loves brown bread! I recently looked up the origin of this recipe and was surprised to find that it was created in Boston Massachusetts and in that part of the U.S. it is known as “Boston Brown Bread”. However, the most surprising fact about it’s origin, is that it was originally made in a tin can! It can even still be found sold in a tin can in Boston markets.

I am sharing this delicious recipe with you. It’s very sweet. A slice could be eaten on it’s own with some Earth Balance butter spread on top. It can be served with nice cream. Or served during dinner, which is the way we’ve always served it. It’s origin story said it was always served with baked beans.

Here is my family recipe for Holiday Brown Bread. Read on to hear about our long weekend in the beautiful mountains of Alberta and British Columbia Canada.

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Brown Bread

1 loaf

Ingredients:

  • 2 C of flour
  • 1 tsp of baking soda
  • 1 tsp of baking powder
  • 1/2 C of sugar
  • 1/2 C of molasses
  • 1 Flax egg (1tbs of ground flax seed and 2 1/2 tbs of water)
  • 1 tbs of vegetable shortening
  • 1 C of boiling water

Instructions:

  1. Heat oven at 325º F
  2. Grease and flour a loaf pan
  3. In a large mixing bowl mix together dry ingredients then stir in the wet ingredients.
  4. Pour the batter into the loaf pan.
  5. Bake in the oven for 1 hour.
  6. Take out and let cool.
  7. Serve with dinner, with baked beans, or with your favorite nice cream. *Or you can sneak a slice every couple of hours until you’ve devoured the whole thing like my husband does.

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A winter wonderland

Our adventures in a wintery Canada

Happy snow bunnies

The mountains have a mystical way of drawing us to them. Last weekend my hubby and I venture north to Calgary, Alberta in Canada. We stayed the night in the beautiful city, I miss city life. We had a great place right in the heart of it. What a treasure to look outside and see the skyline all lit up at night.

The next morning we met up with our good Canadian friend and ventured out to the mountains of Banff National Park.

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Banff upper springs

Our first day we walked along a trail just taking the majestic view. We also visited a protected hot spring with an endangered specie of snail only known to Banff Canada. Later in the evening we went swimming in Upper natural hot springs. It was about 30 degrees outside, but the hot spring was about 110 degrees. It was so relaxing.

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The next morning was very cloudy and snowy. We could barely see the mountains anymore. We ventured to the stunning Lake Louis. We couldn’t see the mountains and the lake was frozen and covered with snow. But that didn’t dampen our spirits. The foliage and graceful snow fall  was creating a fairytale beauty all it’s own. We walked along a trail (That I can only assume went around the lake) just admiring the splendor.

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After enjoying the snow for a little while we headed to Emerald Lake in British Columbia. It was still snowing pretty hard there as well, another winter wonderland

We stayed at Emerald Lake Lodge, which I found out later on, that the whole lodge is basically an island in the middle of the lake. I didn’t realize at the time because the lake was frozen over and covered with snow.  At night Emerald Lake transformed into a real life Thomas Kinkaid painting. It was absolutely stunning. Hubby and I spent some time just wandering the little village in awe.

Emerald lake lodge, British Columbia

We Went to bed with no real knowledge that when we woke up the next morning the giant mountains would be smiling down on us. It was like waking up in a new place, with a new kind of beauty.

I felt so humble staring at the vastness of this magnificent mountain. I need to find out it’s true name, but in my mind I keep referring to it as “Grandfather Mountain” because of the respect its presence commands. A stroll through the woods

 

Did I mention I love mountains? Before breakfast, even before coffee, hubby and I eagerly got dressed and headed back out into the snow like a couple of kids.

I don’t know how long we were out there walking around, but its a walk in the snow with my love that I’ll never forget.

Now that the mountains were back out and the sky was blue again, we decided to go back to Lake Louis and she did not disappoint.

Lake Louis

We headed back to Banff’s downtown village for brunch and then said goodbye to the mountains and in Calgary we said goodbye to our good Canadian friend. Then we ventured homeward and reunited with our cherished furbabies.

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The mountains are always calling. They have taken a piece of me and they know it. Now that I love them, they will never let me go. Something happens to me when I am standing in the presence of a mountain. Peace washes over me like a warm bath. I want to run away into the mountains and live in peace.

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