Pineapple Smoothie Bowl

It’s summer time! I have really been looking forward to summer, warm weather, green foliage, beautiful flowers, tan skin, gorgeous sunsets, and most of all summer food!

What I wasn’t prepared for was not having any new summer recipe ideas. Fortunately summer is full of fun inspiration and after a great cup of coffee on a lovely Saturday morning I was able to create a whole list of new ideas, yay!

One of my other passions outside of food is painting. Painting is probably the most therapeutic activity for me. I have been spending a lot of time working on a painting recently. It’s theme is the ocean. To help keep my creativity flowing I have been listening to a lot of Bob Marley and playing beach scene videos on YouTube. It has been such a peaceful escape and now the vibe is flowing into my passion for food.

This weeks recipe was not only inspired by the beginning of summer but also by that perfect day at the beach.

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Pineapple Smoothie Bowl

Ingredients:

  • One pineapple
  • 2 cups pineapple (Frozen is best)
  • 1 cup almond milk
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 scoop protein powder
  • 1 tbs chia seed

Suggested toppings:

  • mango
  • blueberries
  • kiwi
  • dragon fruit

Directions:

  1. Slice the pineapple horizontally in front of the stem. Start carving the pineapple into a bowl leaving a 1/2″ thick rim.
  2. For an extra fresh smoothie, freeze the pineapple innards before blending them.
  3. Add all the ingredients to a high power blender and blend.
  4. Pour the ingredients into the pineapple bowl.
  5. Add toppings and enjoy!

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Thank you to those of you who have been following my blog. I really appreciate the support and kind words that inspire me to keep going. If you haven’t had a chance to check out my “About me” page, click the picture below and allow me to introduce myself.

On the shore of Lake McDonald, Glacier National Park

 

Mexican Cauliflower

This is the year that winter decided it didn’t want to leave. No matter how much we kick and scream for it to go away, it continues to show us who the boss really is. I know I am not alone in the struggle, I am prone to seasonal depression. Some years I am not even safe in the summer time, and it has been a real struggle to keep my head “above water” these past few weeks. That is why it is so important to keep my thoughts distracted from the negativity. I am working on a couple of art projects, I try to keep my home clean (clutter and dirty dishes make me anxious), my hubby and I are planning a cross-country move in a few months, and of course I have food. Oh ,how I enjoy good homemade food. No more stews and chilies, I am ready for summer recipes! So I am going to pretend that it’s not really icky outside and focus on my favorite summer time recipes and hopefully come up with some new ones!

Mexican cauliflower is another favorite from my childhood. Anything Mexican has been and always will be a big hit with me. Mexican food doesn’t have it’s seasons, it is appropriate all year round, but I can’t help feeling “summery” about food that comes from such a warm and tropical place.

My mom made this recipe all the time when I was a kid. With a few tweaks and an added spice here and there, I am really excited to enjoy this amazing meal again as an adult. It’s also important to note that this meal is very hubby approved.

*Scroll past the recipe to read more. I share my insights and realizations on something I am most passionate about.

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Mexican Cauliflower

Ingredients:

  • One large head of cauliflower (with the greens removed and the stem trimmed down so the cauliflower lays flat)
  • 2 cups salsa (My own recipe is below)
  • 8oz of vegan cheddar or pepper-jack cheese
  • 1 cup of panko breadcrumbs
  • 2 tbs of finely chopped cilantro
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp salt

For serving:

  • Avocado
  • tortilla chips

Salsa Ingredients & Directions:

  • 1 can of fire roasted tomatoes
  • 1 can of Mexi style lime and cilantro diced tomatoes
  • one handful of cilantro
  • 1 tbs minced garlic
  • 2 tbs of sliced jalapeño
  • 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp cumin
  1. Place cilantro, minced garlic, and jalapeño in a food processor and pulse until the cilantro is very fine
  2. Add the canned tomatoes and spices. Pulse until all the ingredients are blended. Adjust the flavor if you need to and done.

Mexican Cauliflower Directions:

  1. Steam the cauliflower until it is tender, but not so much that it is falling apart. My favorite way to steam vegetables is to use my steamer basket in a large pot.
  2. While the cauliflower is steaming, make the salsa (if you are making it from scratch) directions above. Also, in a large mixing bowl combine the cheese, panko crumbs, cilantro and spices. Shake up the bowl or stir with a spoon to blend and coat everything together.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350ºF and grease a baking dish (I used and 8×8 dish)
  4. When the cauliflower is done steaming (I poke mine with a knife or a fork to check the tenderness) let it cool for about 5 minutes before you transfer it to a baking dish. I used my 8×8 baking dish. Taking care not to burn yourself transfer the cauliflower to the baking dish.
  5. Pour about 2 cups of salsa over the cauliflower. Use a rubber spatula to spread the salsa around the cauliflower so it is completely covered. Then take handfuls of the cheese mixture and coat the cauliflower with it. I find it is easier to just use my hands for this part. It’s ok if salsa and cheese mix fall to the bottom of the pan, it’ll be good for dipping later.
  6. Bake in the oven for 30 – 35 minutes. The cheese mixture is supposed to turn a light golden color and be a little crispy. When done let it cool for 5 – 10 minutes.
  7. There are many options for serving. We enjoy eating it with tortilla chips, avocado and a little extra salsa, but you can serve this in tacos, burritos, over mexican rice, ect.

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Shared thoughts:

“Insight is an experience of the truth that cannot be simply given to another person in the way that one may communicate ideas or beliefs. Insight is spontaneous and has the nature of a gift. It is surprising when it comes and yet obvious. It is joyful and yet calm.” – Lawrence Freeman “The Good Heart”

I am currently reading “The Good Heart, A Buddhist perspective on the teachings of Jesus”, and when I read the passage above it was like it was jumping right off of the page. This passage articulately communicated what I have only recently begun to learn about the emotional connection to becoming a vegan.

Making the choice to be a vegan has to be an emotional one. I know a lot of people who will not like that statement, but it is true. Anyone I’ve ever known who has decided to be a vegetarian or a vegan for any other reason other than the welfare of animals has ALWAYS “fallen of the wagon” so to speak. I have to note: I am not speaking for everyone in the world who has given up meat and bi-products, but I can absolutely say that for the people I know, this is true and there are many of them. Veganism is not just about diet, it’s about life.

So let me rephrase, making the choice to be a TRUE vegan has to be an emotional one. It has to hurt. That means tapping into a part of yourself that is so deep, that you can finally make the connection between the faceless meat on the plate and the animal that was killed to be there. You can never look at meat as food again. That means completely rewiring your way of life and for many people, that is too uncomfortable to even fathom.

I would go as far as equating it to a spiritual experience. Once you’ve turned that part of your brain on, that gets switched off through conditioning while you’re growing up, it’s a little like waking up with new vision. You see the world and the other beings we share it with, in a whole new way. As soon as the switch turns back on, there’s no question anymore of “how am I going to give up meat?” Or “how am I going to give up cheese?” The question I hear the most is “why didn’t I do this sooner?”

Before I make my next statement, I want to be clear, I 100% support animal rights activists. I think they are some of the boldest and bravest people on the planet and I admire them greatly.

You can’t force people to care. You can help them try to make the connection, but it has to be something they discover on their own. I feel at this point it is important to refer back to my opening quote, “Insight is an experience of the truth that cannot be simply given to another person in the way that one may communicate ideas or beliefs. Insight is spontaneous and has the nature of a gift. It is surprising when it comes and yet obvious. It is joyful and yet calm.

Those closest to me don’t want to know, they don’t want to acknowledge the suffering that happens. I have shared with them all that is wrong with meat and bi-products. I have proven to them how easy and delicious it is to make vegan meals. But they refuse. Even though I have this blog and I spend hours, sometimes even days creating an all vegan recipe, my parents will still add meat to them. I have never been the kind of person to shove my lifestyle in someone else’s face. When a person feels shoved their response will almost always be to shove back. I have always recognized it as a personal choice. I wish I could get more people to care, but people do not appreciate having their way of life and their comfortable routine disrupted.

Q: What is the difference between a dog and a pig? A: Your perception.

Every culture is conditioned to believe that animals are here to meet our needs. We are not born with this mindset in place. Just look up kids who don’t want to eat meat on the internet. There are so many videos and stories of children crying because they’ve realized that what is on their plate was once a living thing. There are also videos of children crying over their live chickens that mom and dad are about to kill. Children know better. They haven’t been calloused and brainwashed by cultural norms. They are still able to make the connection from one living being to another.

One of the saddest things I ever witnessed personally was when a little boy, I used to babysit, wanted to bring his cat inside from the rain and his parents scolded him and told him how disgusting it was. They made him throw his cat back outside in the rain storm. Here was this sweet, thoughtful, innocent child just trying to do a kindness for another living being, probably someone he loved, and here were his parents, calloused and unthoughtful of not only their “family pet”, but of their child as well. Think of the damage their words/actions have caused. Will he think twice that next time he wants to help someone? Will it be so bad that one day he’ll see an injured animal and not think enough of it to stop and help?

Then there are people who say they are animal lovers. Let’s be clear, if there is meat on your plate, you are not an animal lover. You may love cats, dogs, or cute forest critters, but if you can’t distinct living beings as equals you don’t love animals. Humans pride themselves on having higher consciousness and yet, they are tremendously unaware of the parts of thier mind that are shut off. All animals, like humans, know fear and feel pain. They also know happiness and comfort. Through childhood people are conditioned to forget this about animals whether they wanted to or not. Why? Because that’s the way we’ve always done it (My least favorite phrase on the planet.).

Eating meat is a form of intolerance, a bold phrase, I know. But allow me to define intolerance and then I’ll explain. Intolerance is the unwillingness to accept views, beliefs or behaviors that differ from one’s own. Animals have their own languages and behaviors and because of lack of understanding and tolerance, humans are under the impression that that gives them the right to use and abuse animals. If you don’t belive that, just look at the way we treat fellow humans we don’t understand. At the core of all intolerance is apathy.

I would like to point out, that I never once said that all people who eat meat are bad. Some of the nicest people I know and love eat meat. I am trying to convey that to become a true vegan (a real animal lover), you have to tap into the part of your brain, even your heart, that finally grasps the understanding that a cow wants to be happy and left to take care of her child as much a dog with puppies, that a chicken does not want to die just as you do not wish to die. Your perception will change and you will finally see that animals are not here to feed us, cloth us, or entertain us. They are sharing this world with us. Just as you would want the suffering of a fellow man to end, you can now recognize the mass suffering of animals and want it to end. Once you’ve made that connection food will never look the same.

“Insight is an experience of the truth that cannot be simply given to another person in the way that one may communicate ideas or beliefs.” I have just shared my own insights, my realized truths about what it takes to become a true vegan. I hope it spoke to you in a positive way, but like I said from the begining, it is very much like a spiritual experience. It’s personal and it’s exceptional, but you have to find it deep within.

Grandma’s Zucchini bread

My family is everything to me. And I have been immensely blessed by the women in my family, they have instilled so many treasured values in my life. I was a pen pal with my great grandma from my childhood into adulthood. I’ve also been a pen pal with my grandma since I was a little kid; which has been exceedingly therapeutic since I moved so far away from her. They helped me appreciate the art of letter writing and sending cards. My mom has passed down recipes to me that she received from her mom, that grandma received from her own mother and so forth. Generations of women taking care of each other.

One of those cherished recipes is Zucchini bread. I remember my friend’s mother bringing zucchini from her garden so my mom could make her some loaves of our family’s zucchini bread. My mom got the recipe from her grandma and now she has passed it on to me. This was a very delicate recipe for me to modify. I didn’t want to alter it too much because then it wouldn’t be my family’s recipe anymore. All I did was switch from chicken eggs to flax eggs. Then added a healthier oil option; from vegetable oil to coconut oil. Everything else is original and just as delicious as I remember it.

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Zucchini Bread Recipe (vegan)

Serving: 2 loaves        Bake time: 1 hour

Ingredients:

  • 3 flax eggs (3tbsp of ground flax-seed mixed with 6-7tbs of water, set for 10 minute)
  • 2 cups of sugar
  • 1 cup of coconut oil
  • 2 tsp of vanilla
  • 2 cups of shredded zucchini
  • 3 cups of flour
  • 1/2 tsp of salt
  • 2 tsp of cinnamon
  • 1 tsp of baking soda
  • 1 tsp of baking powder

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Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 300 degree
  2. Grease two loaf pans
  3. In a large bowl, whisk the flax eggs, sugar, oil, and vanilla
  4. Stir the shredded zucchini in with the sugar mix
  5. In a separate bowl mix the flour, salt, cinnamon, baking soda, and baking powder.
  6. Using a sifter, sift the dry mixture over of the wet mixture and mix them together
  7. Split the batter between the two pans
  8. Bake for 1 hour (check the center with a toothpick; if it comes out clean, it’s done)
  9. Remove from the oven and let it cool down in the pan.

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